Green growth in Africa

The biobased economy is not theoretical or in the distant future - it is happening now. A real example is how Novozymes and CleanStar Ventures are jointly establishing an integrated food-energy business in Mozambique.

The biobased economy is not theoretical or in the distant future - it is happening now. A real example is how Novozymes and CleanStar Ventures are jointly establishing an integrated food-energy business in Mozambique.

By rethinking how we use one of our most abundant renewable resources - plants - we can help meet growing needs for food, feed, fuel and fiber, all at the same time. This is what is known as the biobased economy.

  

Mozambique leads the way towards the biobased economy

The biobased economy is not theoretical or in the distant future - it is happening now. A real example is how Novozymes and CleanStar Ventures are jointly establishing an integrated food-energy business in Mozambique that will replace thousands of charcoal-burning cookstoves with cleaner ethanol stoves. In addition to safeguarding lives from dangerous charcoal smoke, the business is boosting agricultural output, drastically increasing farmers’ incomes, saving thousands of acres of forest every year, and resulting in major reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.

Visit CleanStar's website.

The food-energy project in Mozambique

CleanStar Mozambique is helping smallholder farmers in the Sofala province implement an environmentally restorative agroforestry system on their own land. Whatever the families do not consume themselves, they will be able to sell to the company. They can drastically improve their own nutrition while also increasing their income by over 300%. From the surpluses sold to the company, CleanStar Mozambique will produce a range of food products as well as an ethanol-based cooking fuel. Both fuel and products will be sold into urban markets, notably Maputo. By 2014, the venture plans to involve 3,000 smallholders, over 6,000 hectares of land, supply 20 percent of Maputo households with a clean alternative to charcoal (at a competitive price), and protect 4,000 hectares of indigenous forests per year.

See also New York Times green blog on the Mozambique project.​